Tuxford: The growth and decline of a railway centre – Part 2

Robin Stewart-Smith concludes his historical review of Tuxford, a town that once had a railway works and three railway stations.

On New Year’s Day 1907, the LD & ECR was absorbed by the Great Central Railway. Negotiations had begun with the GCR some two years earlier after talks with the GNR failed.

LNER ‘A1’ 60126 Sir Vincent Raven heads a Down passenger service through Tuxford Junction in August 1962. The west curve to the LD & ECR is to the right of the exchange sidings. J S HANCOCK
LNER ‘A1’ 60126 Sir Vincent Raven heads a Down passenger service through Tuxford Junction in August 1962. The west curve to the LD & ECR is to the right of the exchange sidings. J S HANCOCK

The LD & ECR’s business had expanded significantly over the 10 years from 1897.

Though overall passenger traffic had increased by more than 100% to more than half a million carried, coal traffic had seen a massive 500+% increase to 2.6 million tons carried, from just under half a million tons in 1897.

Gross annual receipts had increased from £42,456 in 1897 to £176,287 in 1907. Net annual receipts rose from £17,796 to £60,058 over the same period. Coal traffic was by far the most important element in LD & ECR business. The GCR also inherited the 37-strong locomotive fleet from the LD & ECR – together with 76 carriages and 1,271 goods and mineral wagons.

The Edwardian years leading up to the start of the First World War in 1914, saw Tuxford’s greatest importance as a railway centre. There were three railway stations, a locomotive works, a motive power depot, two sets of exchange sidings and a north-to-west connection – all generating considerable local employment.

Read more in November’s issue of The RM

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